Posts Tagged ‘All Purpose Plant Food’

Tomato Gardening Tips for Tasty Fruit

Monday, June 24th, 2013

What better way to celebrate summer than planting your own tomato plant and picking fresh fruit right off the vine. It is never too early in the season to start thinking about your tomato garden. Growing great tasting tomatoes doesn’t just happen, however. It takes some time tested growing tips to get the earliest and sweetest tomatoes you can and continue to getting them all season.

Space Out Your Seedlings

Starting tomatoes from seed can be very rewarding if you remember one simple rule: give your seedlings room to branch out. When planting seeds it is important to remember their need for space when the plants become more mature. Close quarters can inhibit growth so you should transplant the small plants as soon as the first true leaves sprout out. They should then be planted in four inch pots to continue their growth.

Remember Light

Tomato plants are light loving and need strong, direct sunlight or at least 14 to 18 hours under grow lights every day. When considering where to plant your seedlings, you should look for the sunniest part of the garden and plant there. You can place containers or pots in that area if the soil is not conducive to planting directly in ground.

Bury and Mulch

If you purchase more mature tomato plants, you may have noticed the pots are rather shallow. You should remove them from the pot and replant them in the ground or another pot all the way up to the few top leaves of the plant. One great thing about tomato plants is they can develop root systems all along the stem of the plant. Once the plant is buried in the soil, you should mulch to conserve water and help prevent disease.

Prune and Water

Once the tomato plants have started growing, you should remove the bottom leaves of the plant. These leaves are the ones most affected by disease and fungus. You should also remove the suckers that develop in the joints of two branches. These suckers take away from the energy of the entire plant. The final thing is to remember to water the plant regularly while it is growing. If you do not, you run the risk of blossom end rot and cracking.

Tips for Successful Flower Container Gardening

Saturday, June 8th, 2013

Mary, Mary, quite contrary. How does your garden grow? You may be familiar with the old nursery rhyme about the lady that planted silver bells in a row in the ground. If you are planning a flower container garden, then this will require more care to promote healthy vigorous growth.

Consider Your Container Choices

The first major consideration with flower container gardening is the container itself. They should be deep enough to accommodate the growing plant’s roots. Make sure you are not using a shallow container because it will dry the plant out quickly and stress the flower you have planted. The two considerations needed when choosing a container is the depth of the container and whether there are drainage holes in the bottom. The drainage holes ensure proper drainage so the plant will not drown in water while maintaining proper solubility of the s

 

oil. You may place some newspaper over the drainage holes to avoid the potting soil from leaking out of the drainage holes during watering.

Fertilize! Fertilize!

Before you plant anything in your container, make sure you add fertilizer into the soil. Slow release fertilizer is the best option because it will continuously fertilize the plant for about three weeks before you have to reapply. It is better to leach the soil of any old fertilizer before adding the new fertilizer to the top of the soil. You can do this by running clean water through the container until it runs out the bottom drainage holes. This should be done continuously until the water is pouring out as fast as it is being poured in.

Cut Your Plants Back

If it seems that your flowers are not doing well in the container, try cutting them back to encourage new growth of the plant. This should also be done for leggy plants or plants that are not bushing out. Once the plant has been cut back, apply liquid fertilizer to the soil, taking care not to touch the plant base. Any blooms or spent areas of the plant should be removed promptly to encourage new flower production.

 

 

Onward and Upward with Vertical Gardening

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

For many, gardening is just something they think about doing and don’t
because of lack of space. Well , even if you only have a very limited area , you can
garden and produce a surprising amount of veggies or flowers , depending on what type of
gardening you want to do.

The following are some ideas and tips for making your venture into
vertical gardening a success.

First decide what you want to grow, then pick your spot, making sure that
the spot will get sufficient sun throughout the day.

If you are going to give it a try  next to a chain link fence ,whether in
a container or right in the ground you already have your trellis. And the bonus is the plants
foliage will cover up that ugly old fence.

Lets say that you only have a deck or porch to grow from, that means you
will want to use a container to plant in. Then you will need something for the plant to
climb on,you can use many different things.

You can try some lattice ,that can be purchased at your local lumber yard.
Then just attach it to the building or railings of the deck directly behind the container.

You can use something as simple as rope or wire. Use your imagination , it
is your masterpiece to create. Remember there is no wrong way to do it.
Some plants naturally climb and some you will have to train, just tie them
with a piece of cloth or twist ties or twine . Again there are many different things you can use.

After your plants are in the soil and begin to grow , you will need to
keep them fed properly.

It’s a good idea to use a well balanced liquid plant food , we suggest
“Watch Us Grow”all purpose liquid plant food , it will supply outstanding results on all
vegetables, flowers and crops.

Companion Gardening May Help Some Issues In The Garden

Saturday, May 26th, 2012

Companion Gardening will not completely solve all of the many problems you
can have in your vegetable garden, but it will definitely help.

The following is a list of some of the most commonly planted fruits and
vegetables in the average garden, and the companion plants to help with pests and the
disease that may be caused by them.

Bush Beans : plant a small amount of celery with them, about one celery
plant to every six bean plants. Beans also do well when planted
with cucumbers.

Beets :  Beets do well around bush beans, onions and kohlrabi.
Broccoli : you can plant many different types of aromatic plants around
broccoli and it will do well.  Some examples are rosemary , dill , camomile ,
sage and peppermint.

Some vegetables that go well with broccoli are onions, beets and potatoes
Carrots : will do well when planted around tomato plants also onions ,
leaf lettuce, leeks, radishes, sage and rosemary.

Corn : Corn enjoys the companionship of cucumbers, squash, pumpkins ,
peas, beans, and potatoes.

Cucumbers : cucumbers like corn along with sunflowers , peas , beans and
radishes.

Kohlrabi : cucumbers along with onions , beets and aromatic plants benefit
kohlrabi

Lettuce : Lettuce does well with strawberries , cucumbers , carrots and
onions. the onions also help keep the rabbits away.

Onions : onions like tomatoes , lettuce , beets , strawberries and all
members of the cabbage family.

Peas : peas do well with potatoes , cucumbers , carrots , radishes , corn
, beans and turnips.

Radishes : Radishes will do well with kohlrabi , bush and pole beans
Tomatoes : tomatoes are compatible with basil , carrots , parsley , onions
, chives , marigold and nasturtium , also garlic

All of the plants in your garden need to be fed throughout the growing
season , we recommend feeding all of your garden with “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant
food  if you have never used Watch Us Grow , try it! You will be pleasantly surprised with the
results you will experience.

Save Money by Growing Your Own Birdseed

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Are you a person who enjoys having birds around your yard? Then you probably feed them.

So you also know that feeding your feathered friends is a bit costly. For instance a 50 pound bag of Black Oil Sunflower seed is nearing $30.00 .

Packaged birdseed is big business, approximately 4.7 billion pounds of bird food is purchased in the United States annually.

There is a way to save some money and still keep the birds happy. Try growing your own seeds, there are many different types you can grow easily.

Berry rich plants and shrubs will draw birds year round , also seed and nectar plants will keep them around.

Some varieties like sunflower , coneflower and cosmos – develop daisy like seed heads , which acts as an organic bird feeder. You can harvest your seeds and keep them for feeding at a later date. But I would recommend just letting the birds pick the seeds right off of the plants.

Feeding the birds is good for people, watching them feed in the backyard,either from a feeder or right off the plant ,is one of the most meaningful interactions that some people will have with wildlife.

Some examples of plants that birds will feed from are:

  • Sunflowers,  there are approximately 70 different varieties.
  • Corn, popcorn and Indian corn are just two of many different types.
  • Black eyed susan
  • Purple coneflower Cosmos

Look to the internet for many more bird friendly types of plants .

Remember when you grow your own, Feed them” Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food for bigger and better harvests for you feathered friends.

How To Choose The Right Compost and Create Happy Plants

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Compost = Great Soil = Great Garden

How to choose the RIGHT compost. As we have talked about many times before, good soil will help you have a good gardening experience. So much great composting materials end up in the landfills everyday.

Compost is like fine dining to plants – they love it!  Some people think that compost is grass clippings and leaves collected from the yard, they are right, but it is so much more than that.

We here at “Watch Us Grow”all purpose liquid plant food we get asked quite often “what can I put in my compost pile?” and “How to choose the right compost”So we put together a list of some of the many items you can compost.

  • cow manure, pig manure, horse manure, chicken manure, rabbit manure, bat guano
  • apple cores & peelings, potato peelings, tea bags, bread crusts, toast
  • cooked rice, cheerios, macaroni & cheese, shredded brown paper bags, banana peels, fruit salad
  •  peat moss, melted ice cream, moldy cheese, old yogurt
  • crab, lobster, shrimp shells
  • human hair, pet hair, dust bunnies
  • vacuum cleaner bag contents, coffee grounds, egg shells, paper towels, shredded newspaper
  • houseplant trimmings, pie crusts
  • orange, grapefruit rinds, old pasta
  • finger & toenail clippings
  • onion skins, nut shells, watermelon rinds, old beer & wine.

Remember this is just a SMALL list of the possible composting material.

You get the idea,  just about anything can go in the compost pile.

If you have all this in your compost pile, your plants are going to love you after you add it to the soil. And also remember to always feed your garden with “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food every 10 to 14 days throughout the growing season.

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team

(800) 921-5542

Is our food supply in danger

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Lets face facts , if we had to raise our own food to survive most people would not make it.

This is a very real possibility – with the technology of patenting seeds called Genetic Engineering (GE). This technology is imperfect at best,it’s cell invasion that transfers selected traits of one specie to the engineered specie. This can result in a plant that will resist some of the common problems some crops have. But in natures complex world, such manipulation of genes and cells can cause major problems.

For example some of the GE seeds have genes from pesticides in them , causing the plant to behave like a pesticide. These muti national corporations with their bought and paid for Governments and regulators expect us to eat the GE foods produced from these seeds. They of course have obtained approval for human consumtion by saying that their GE foods and fibers are ”substantially equivalent” to the heirloom types , but in the same breath also say that their products are “quite different” and should have patent protection.

Wait a minute ,- who invented the first seeds which they are messing with. Oh yeah -… Mother Nature! They ( the mutinational corporations) need to wake up , don’t be messing’ with Mother Nature, she has a way of always coming out on top.

The worlds Farmers are the ones that have developed the best hybrids , over many years of testing and trials. Natural hybridization is the natural genetic modification of seeds , this practice has gone on for thousands of years. But when the mutinational corporations came on the scene they used agricultural scientist to gain the trust of the farmers, who in turn helped them promote their GM (genetically modified) seeds.

Actually got them to believe that the GM seeds were better than their own. The typical farmer wants to boost his yield because he believes it leads to more income,and this is exactly what the mutinationals want them to believe ,this is not the truth . If all farms had bumper crops consistently the prices crash and no one suffers worse than the farmer. Farmers who understand the market and consumer behavior make money.

Many of the GM seeds that promised greater yields have failed to perform, but have been successful in contaminating
exsisting farmland and the environment. The use of these GM seeds is possibly the largest uncontrolled biological experiment ever released into the open environment.The mutinationals don’t know the long term affects of the continued use of the GM’s nor do I believe they care.

Biological pollution replicates itself in the environment, and it will intensify with time. At this time we know of no way to reverse this, but we do know some of the consequences of continued use of these GM seeds.

One extremely alarming fact is (CCD)Colony Collapse Disorder,  70% to 90% of bee colonies disappeared in two states in the United States where GM’s were extensively used. A study by German scientists found traces of genes from the GM’s in the gut lining of baby bees, and believe that the GM’s are responsible for the CCD.

Albert Einstein once said that without the honey bee man would not survive for more than 4 years. Of all the multinationals none of them compete with each other, for instance Monsanto has control of canola, soybean and vegetable seeds. They also have 25% to 30% of cucumber , potato and tomato seeds.

Here’s a surprise-not  , the USDA is in bed with Monsanto, owning stock in a company that Monsanto succesfully took over. I guess this is just a fact of life, man is out to destroy this planet ,all for the cash.

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team

(800) 921-5542

Tomato Troubles?

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Tomatoes sometimes become sick during the growing season. We will give you some of the causes, and some preventive measures you can take to have a healthy gardening experience.

Tomatoes can be attacked by a combination of problems. Insects, bacteria,fungus, viruses are the most common. Environmental factors often are the reason, some of these are over watering, excessive sunlight and temperature swings. Another problem is poor soil, it weakens their immune system.

Also insects can spread disease just by traveling from an infected plant to a healthy one. For instance, Thrips can carry spotted wild virus. Beet leaf hoppers are a major carrier of curly top virus. If you commonly have problems with these pests you will want to grow a variety that is resistant to them. There are cultivars that are naturally resistant to different viruses. Talk to your local Garden Center personal, they are very knowledgeable about what varieties will do best in your area.

If you have a sick plant, treat it quickly or remove it completely from your garden to help prevent the further spreading of disease. Remember if you prune diseased plants DO NOT compost trimmings , this may further spread the disease. The best thing to do is burn the trimmings. And remember to clean your shears completely after having any contact with infected plants.

Another way to help prevent pests is to do “companion planting” some companions to the tomato plant are Marigolds, Carrots and Nasturtiums. Plant them next to the tomatoes or around the border of the garden, they release scents that naturally repel many insects. You can also try “sacrifice planting”this is the practice of planting a plant that is more attractive to insects than tomatoes.

For example, plant some sweet corn on the opposite side of the garden, a large percentage of tomato fruit worms will be diverted to the corn plant. When the corn becomes infected and has eggs layed on it, pull it out of the garden and discard it, again burning is the preferred way to get rid of it. This will eliminate the next generation of pests before they hatch.

  The following are some solutions to common tomato problems

. Use mulch to hold moisture on hot days

. Space tomatoes far enough apart to allow good air circulation

. Harvest fruit quickly after it becomes ripe, over ripe tomatoes attract pests

. Make sure any compost used is fully decomposed or it can attract pests

. Support tomatoes with cages to promote good air circulation

. Always feed you plant with a well balanced all purpose liquid plant food we suggest “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food

 

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team
(800) 921-5542

Organic vs. Conventional Farming

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Organic vs Conventional Farming…. Do we have enough?

Many people in first world countries don’t even give it a second thought. Never having to worry about where your next meal is coming from rarely goes through the mind of these people. But throughout the world many do think about it,and for many it’s daily. I’m not writing this article to bash Organic farming, I think it has it’s good points as far as mother earth is concerned. I do believe that people are brainwashed to a certain extent about Organics vs. Conventional farming. For instance,most think that anything called or labeled Organic is good.

It’s just not true, there are many grey areas in the Organic laws & rules that are turning the whole organic farming movement into a cash cow for those involved. And as is with most everything our Government is up to their eyeballs in it.

The real point I want to make  with organic vs conventional is that we need conventional farming to feed the worlds population!

If we tried to do it with Organic farming we would starve, the following are some Statistics from the National Agriculture Statistics Service of USDA, organic corn yields could only produce 71 % of the national average for conventional corn production.

Organic soybean yields could only reach 66% of the national average, and organic wheat yields could only produce between 62 to 66% of the national average grown conventionally. To put these numbers into perspective,the organic yields of corn in 2008 are equal to what conventional farming was producing 22 years ago.

Organic soybeans equal to what conventional farming was producing 29 years ago, and organic wheat equal to 57 years ago. These numbers are alarming at best. Until organic production can equal or surpass conventional ways of farming, I believe we need to stay the course with finding even better ways to improve conventional farming.

One way we here at “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food suggest is to incorporate foliar feeding along with conventional dry fertilizing. It has shown that growers can lessen the amount of dry fertilizer applied to the ground. Use “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food as a supplement and have as good and better yields.

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team
(800) 921-5542

Growing Fruits

Monday, June 27th, 2011

Considering the hardships we’re all experiencing when it comes to buying eco-friendly fruits and vegetables that are not entirely injected with harmful substances for our own health, growing fruits in your own garden seems to be a top-notch idea. There are plenty of tips and pieces of advice you really need to be fully aware of, if you’re planning on becoming your own fruit provider, and you’re about to read some insightful ideas.

First and foremost, you need to realize that growing fruits is not the easiest task you might handle, but it is not the hardest either. You need to know that pesticides and fertilizers are still going to be a big issue; luckily, you can lay your hands on a great gardening product that can really do you a lot of help: Watch Us Grow All Purpose Liquid Plant Food. You can use this fertilizer to rapidly grow your favorite fruits in a very health-oriented manner, you can ensure the quality of your fruits and their exquisite taste and you won’t have to worry about having wasted your money on seeds and other specific products.

Next, you need to decide upon the type of fruits you are most interested in. Make sure the soil you are about to use for your fruit garden is appropriate for the type of fruit you have in mind. Then choose soft berries, because these are some of the easiest fruits you could grow at home, they have excellent flavors and they are ready to be harvested when they are fully ripe.

Of course you also need to rely your decision on the actual size of your garden; you can also choose to grow tree fruits, provided you are have enough space to plant these trees and maintain them properly. Dwarf fruit trees might be some of your best choices, considering these trees are small in size and you can pick up their fruits extremely easy from above the ground. You can opt for blackberries, strawberries or berries that are known to grow on vines or bushes.

Picture these trees and the way they would look like inside your garden and make sure you’re making the perfect pick. Contemplate the growth of apples, pears or cherries, if these are some of your favorite fruits. Don’t worry about your crop being shred to pieces because of improper soil or damaging weather conditions. You can make full use of the All Purpose Liquid Plant Food fertilizer and enjoy your fresh and healthy fruit.

If you’re worrying about crawling pests, you don’t have to; there are plenty of ways of getting rid of those, and one of them refers to the use of tree bands that can actually capture these pests while they’re climbing up the trunks of your fruit trees. You can also use some highly efficient sticky plastic bands that are able to prevent ants and caterpillars from ruining your fruits.

All in all, there are many things you should be aware of before embarking on this sometimes demanding trip of fruit gardening; but with the right plan in your mind and Watch Us Grow All Purpose Liquid Plant Food, you’ll be ready to go.

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions,
The Watch Us Grow Team