It’s important to rotate your gardens.


Rotate Your Garden

It’s a good idea to rotate your plantings, in fact you should do it..Sometimes it’s not that easy , particularly when you have limited space. But the advantages of doing it far outweigh the disadvantages. It helps prevents the recurrence of pests and different diseases in the beds.

Rotation is also a benefit to the soil, because certain plants will feed more heavily on certain nutrients therefore depleting the soil, so changing it up as far as plantings is always a great idea.

And it’s always a good idea to add compost and some type of organic matter  on an annual basis this will help rebuild it.

A couple of examples, onions for instance, you must rotate those every year. Reason being, if you had trouble with onion maggots, they will die out after you move your onions to another location. Another example, Tomatoes, potatoes, peppers or eggplants those must be moved because they’re prone to soil borne diseases. Once you move them it interrupts the life cycle of the disease, this is a good thing.

But remember you must move them a fair distance away from the place they were planted, a few feet is not enough. If your garden is very small you may find that you’ll have to discontinue growing certain plants for a year or so.

If you have any more questions contact us at sales@watchusgrow.com and if you want to pick up some new all purpose plant food CLICK HERE.

Happy Gardening!

Soil temperature is critical to Vegetable garden success


soil-temperature

We here at Watch Us Grow love to garden – And we want you to love it too!

 There is nothing better than harvesting your own fresh Tomatoes,Cucumbers, peas, Beans,Carrots,onions or whatever it is that you planted in your garden. But as much as we want you to love it , we also want you to be successful at it.


There is a little pre planting work to do besides the usual tilling of
your plot.


If this is your first go around with vegetable gardening you should choose a plot that will get full sun for most of the daylight hours, also choose a spot the is not to low as these areas will tend to be possibly to wet at times.

But most importantly make sure your not planting to early – we’re talking
about soil temperature.


Some cool weather crops such as carrots, leaf lettuce, peas, spinach,onions, can be planted in soil as cool as 40 degrees. Most of your other plants or seeds you should not plant until the soil reaches 55 to 60 degrees or higher.


You can check the soil temperature with  soil thermometer similar to the type you may use for composting.

If you are looking to order Watch Us Grow, please click here: http://allpurposeplantfood.com/store/

Winter Burn


winter-burn

Why did my evergreens turn brown?

Here in the Midwest we had an unusually harsh winter , cold and snow
like we have not seen in quite some time.

Many evergreens may have turned brown or a golden color, this is called
winter burn.

The main reason this happens is because the tree or plant cannot take up
water from the ground because it is frozen.

They need to replace the water that the sun will evaporate from the leaves
or needles.

The extremely cold winds can also cause the winter burn.

Another cause is salt – salt from the plows that keep the roadways clear
or the salt that you may use to keep you walkways or decks free of ice.
This salt can be thrown from the plows or shoveled from your walkways onto
or under the trees or plants.

One way to protect your trees or plants is to wrap them in burlap for the
winter, they will not miss the sun as they are dormant in the winter.
But most of all you need to be patient – chances are very high that the
tree or plant will be just fine, after it warms up the tree or plant
should green right back up and look just fine.

Tomato Gardening Tips for Tasty Fruit


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What better way to celebrate summer than planting your own tomato plant and picking fresh fruit right off the vine. It is never too early in the season to start thinking about your tomato garden. Growing great tasting tomatoes doesn’t just happen, however. It takes some time tested growing tips to get the earliest and sweetest tomatoes you can and continue to getting them all season.

Space Out Your Seedlings

Starting tomatoes from seed can be very rewarding if you remember one simple rule: give your seedlings room to branch out. When planting seeds it is important to remember their need for space when the plants become more mature. Close quarters can inhibit growth so you should transplant the small plants as soon as the first true leaves sprout out. They should then be planted in four inch pots to continue their growth.

Remember Light

Tomato plants are light loving and need strong, direct sunlight or at least 14 to 18 hours under grow lights every day. When considering where to plant your seedlings, you should look for the sunniest part of the garden and plant there. You can place containers or pots in that area if the soil is not conducive to planting directly in ground.

Bury and Mulch

If you purchase more mature tomato plants, you may have noticed the pots are rather shallow. You should remove them from the pot and replant them in the ground or another pot all the way up to the few top leaves of the plant. One great thing about tomato plants is they can develop root systems all along the stem of the plant. Once the plant is buried in the soil, you should mulch to conserve water and help prevent disease.

Prune and Water

Once the tomato plants have started growing, you should remove the bottom leaves of the plant. These leaves are the ones most affected by disease and fungus. You should also remove the suckers that develop in the joints of two branches. These suckers take away from the energy of the entire plant. The final thing is to remember to water the plant regularly while it is growing. If you do not, you run the risk of blossom end rot and cracking.

Tips for Successful Flower Container Gardening


container-gardening

Mary, Mary, quite contrary. How does your garden grow? You may be familiar with the old nursery rhyme about the lady that planted silver bells in a row in the ground. If you are planning a flower container garden, then this will require more care to promote healthy vigorous growth.

Consider Your Container Choices

The first major consideration with flower container gardening is the container itself. They should be deep enough to accommodate the growing plant’s roots. Make sure you are not using a shallow container because it will dry the plant out quickly and stress the flower you have planted. The two considerations needed when choosing a container is the depth of the container and whether there are drainage holes in the bottom. The drainage holes ensure proper drainage so the plant will not drown in water while maintaining proper solubility of the s

 

oil. You may place some newspaper over the drainage holes to avoid the potting soil from leaking out of the drainage holes during watering.

Fertilize! Fertilize!

Before you plant anything in your container, make sure you add fertilizer into the soil. Slow release fertilizer is the best option because it will continuously fertilize the plant for about three weeks before you have to reapply. It is better to leach the soil of any old fertilizer before adding the new fertilizer to the top of the soil. You can do this by running clean water through the container until it runs out the bottom drainage holes. This should be done continuously until the water is pouring out as fast as it is being poured in.

Cut Your Plants Back

If it seems that your flowers are not doing well in the container, try cutting them back to encourage new growth of the plant. This should also be done for leggy plants or plants that are not bushing out. Once the plant has been cut back, apply liquid fertilizer to the soil, taking care not to touch the plant base. Any blooms or spent areas of the plant should be removed promptly to encourage new flower production.

 

 

Onward and Upward with Vertical Gardening


vertical-gardening

For many, gardening is just something they think about doing and don’t
because of lack of space. Well , even if you only have a very limited area , you can
garden and produce a surprising amount of veggies or flowers , depending on what type of
gardening you want to do.

The following are some ideas and tips for making your venture into
vertical gardening a success.

First decide what you want to grow, then pick your spot, making sure that
the spot will get sufficient sun throughout the day.

If you are going to give it a try  next to a chain link fence ,whether in
a container or right in the ground you already have your trellis. And the bonus is the plants
foliage will cover up that ugly old fence.

Lets say that you only have a deck or porch to grow from, that means you
will want to use a container to plant in. Then you will need something for the plant to
climb on,you can use many different things.

You can try some lattice ,that can be purchased at your local lumber yard.
Then just attach it to the building or railings of the deck directly behind the container.

You can use something as simple as rope or wire. Use your imagination , it
is your masterpiece to create. Remember there is no wrong way to do it.
Some plants naturally climb and some you will have to train, just tie them
with a piece of cloth or twist ties or twine . Again there are many different things you can use.

After your plants are in the soil and begin to grow , you will need to
keep them fed properly.

It’s a good idea to use a well balanced liquid plant food , we suggest
“Watch Us Grow”all purpose liquid plant food , it will supply outstanding results on all
vegetables, flowers and crops.

Companion Gardening May Help Some Issues In The Garden


companion-gardening

Companion Gardening will not completely solve all of the many problems you
can have in your vegetable garden, but it will definitely help.

The following is a list of some of the most commonly planted fruits and
vegetables in the average garden, and the companion plants to help with pests and the
disease that may be caused by them.

Bush Beans : plant a small amount of celery with them, about one celery
plant to every six bean plants. Beans also do well when planted
with cucumbers.

Beets :  Beets do well around bush beans, onions and kohlrabi.
Broccoli : you can plant many different types of aromatic plants around
broccoli and it will do well.  Some examples are rosemary , dill , camomile ,
sage and peppermint.

Some vegetables that go well with broccoli are onions, beets and potatoes
Carrots : will do well when planted around tomato plants also onions ,
leaf lettuce, leeks, radishes, sage and rosemary.

Corn : Corn enjoys the companionship of cucumbers, squash, pumpkins ,
peas, beans, and potatoes.

Cucumbers : cucumbers like corn along with sunflowers , peas , beans and
radishes.

Kohlrabi : cucumbers along with onions , beets and aromatic plants benefit
kohlrabi

Lettuce : Lettuce does well with strawberries , cucumbers , carrots and
onions. the onions also help keep the rabbits away.

Onions : onions like tomatoes , lettuce , beets , strawberries and all
members of the cabbage family.

Peas : peas do well with potatoes , cucumbers , carrots , radishes , corn
, beans and turnips.

Radishes : Radishes will do well with kohlrabi , bush and pole beans
Tomatoes : tomatoes are compatible with basil , carrots , parsley , onions
, chives , marigold and nasturtium , also garlic

All of the plants in your garden need to be fed throughout the growing
season , we recommend feeding all of your garden with “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant
food  if you have never used Watch Us Grow , try it! You will be pleasantly surprised with the
results you will experience.

Save Money by Growing Your Own Birdseed


Are you a person who enjoys having birds around your yard? Then you probably feed them.

So you also know that feeding your feathered friends is a bit costly. For instance a 50 pound bag of Black Oil Sunflower seed is nearing $30.00 .

Packaged birdseed is big business, approximately 4.7 billion pounds of bird food is purchased in the United States annually.

There is a way to save some money and still keep the birds happy. Try growing your own seeds, there are many different types you can grow easily.

Berry rich plants and shrubs will draw birds year round , also seed and nectar plants will keep them around.

Some varieties like sunflower , coneflower and cosmos – develop daisy like seed heads , which acts as an organic bird feeder. You can harvest your seeds and keep them for feeding at a later date. But I would recommend just letting the birds pick the seeds right off of the plants.

Feeding the birds is good for people, watching them feed in the backyard,either from a feeder or right off the plant ,is one of the most meaningful interactions that some people will have with wildlife.

Some examples of plants that birds will feed from are:

  • Sunflowers,  there are approximately 70 different varieties.
  • Corn, popcorn and Indian corn are just two of many different types.
  • Black eyed susan
  • Purple coneflower Cosmos

Look to the internet for many more bird friendly types of plants .

Remember when you grow your own, Feed them” Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food for bigger and better harvests for you feathered friends.

How To Choose The Right Compost and Create Happy Plants


Compost = Great Soil = Great Garden

How to choose the RIGHT compost. As we have talked about many times before, good soil will help you have a good gardening experience. So much great composting materials end up in the landfills everyday.

Compost is like fine dining to plants – they love it!  Some people think that compost is grass clippings and leaves collected from the yard, they are right, but it is so much more than that.

We here at “Watch Us Grow”all purpose liquid plant food we get asked quite often “what can I put in my compost pile?” and “How to choose the right compost”So we put together a list of some of the many items you can compost.

  • cow manure, pig manure, horse manure, chicken manure, rabbit manure, bat guano
  • apple cores & peelings, potato peelings, tea bags, bread crusts, toast
  • cooked rice, cheerios, macaroni & cheese, shredded brown paper bags, banana peels, fruit salad
  •  peat moss, melted ice cream, moldy cheese, old yogurt
  • crab, lobster, shrimp shells
  • human hair, pet hair, dust bunnies
  • vacuum cleaner bag contents, coffee grounds, egg shells, paper towels, shredded newspaper
  • houseplant trimmings, pie crusts
  • orange, grapefruit rinds, old pasta
  • finger & toenail clippings
  • onion skins, nut shells, watermelon rinds, old beer & wine.

Remember this is just a SMALL list of the possible composting material.

You get the idea,  just about anything can go in the compost pile.

If you have all this in your compost pile, your plants are going to love you after you add it to the soil. And also remember to always feed your garden with “Watch Us Grow” all purpose liquid plant food every 10 to 14 days throughout the growing season.

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team

(800) 921-5542

Beautiful Gardens start with the soil


Spring, when we gardeners start thinking about digging in the soil. Soil preparation is critical to succesful gardens. Plants receive many of their nutrients from the soil, so building your soil up to a point of it being beneficial is important. This does not happen overnight, you should be adding composted material to your soil consistently.

We as gardeners are lucky, we have a simple and low cost solution to our number one problem in the garden….. Yes, compost is easy to obtain and we all produce the materials used in the making of it daily. Much of our common kitchen waste makes for wonderful compost, also lawn clippings and leaves.

Another good source is animal manure, but it must be composted or it will likely do harm to your plants due to the fact that fresh manure is high in ammonia. Fresh manure can be applied to your gardens in the fall and by spring will be perfect for you to plant.

Most plant material after being composted is beneficial. Peat moss is always a good addition to the soil. Now that your soil is prepped and ready to go for another season you need plants. If you choose to buy plants, we recommend going to your local independent Garden Center or Greenhouse, they will have knowledgeable people that can answer any questions you may have. When choosing your plants don’t automatically think you should get the biggest one. Look for a full , lush and sometimes smaller plant with tight buds [if it’s a flowering plant].

Remember to always look your plants over carefully,mainly keep a close eye out for bugs, you don’t need to bring any of them home with you. As far as planting your plants, the labels will tell you whether you should place them in the sun or the shade. Once they are planted feed regularly with a balanced liquid plant food. We suggest Watch Us Grow all purpose liquid plant food.

 

Thank You to all of our gardener friends and we really appreciate your support. Please contact us anytime with any questions, The Watch Us Grow Team
(800) 921-5542

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